Some helpful information for many of us.

You may be oblivious to your partner’s cheating ways, but that doesn’t mean everyone else is. In fact, a fascinating new study suggests that strangers can quickly spot a cheater just by watching how couples get along.

“People can determine whether complete strangers were cheaters or non-cheaters by simply watching them interact for a short period of time,” Dr. Nathaniel Lambert, an assistant professor at Brigham Young University’s School of Family Life and the lead author of the study, told The Huffington Post in an email.

More.

At Happify, we’re translating the latest cutting-edge research into fun and interactive activities and games that help you build your happiness skills and form life-changing habits. Optimism, self-confidence, gratitude, hope, compassion, purpose, empathy—these are all qualities that anyone can own. You just have to learn how. And doing so will change your life.

Happify’s S.T.A.G.E. framework helps you build five key happiness skills: Savor, Thank, Aspire, Give, and Empathize.

Good article. More.

October 10th, 2014

My popular books make great summer reading—as well as gifts. My memoir, Baltho, The Dog Who Owned a Man is about my remarkable Afghan hound rescue named Baltho, with whom I shared a psychic bond. He helped me in my counseling and coaching practice by pointing out things I missed.

Balthocovericonsize

I also recommend my two new books of poetry, The Necessity of Symbols,

TRWatson_NecessityOfSymbols_coverand Love Threads, a remarkable narrative of an often paranormal love affair that takes place mostly in the soul realm. LoveThreads_COVER_LS

In my books I often talks about my many mystical experiences, not only with the living, but with those who have passed on.

 

For more on Baltho and his three incarnations (he’s now back for the third time, wanting to be known as Melchior), see this article by British writer and researcher, Geoff Ward.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is Melchior, along with Melchior and his cat Noir. Melchior is working on becoming my co-therapist again.

Melchior_&_NoirOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

If you’d like signed and inscribed copies of my books you can buy them from this site, for the regular retail price. They’re also available from Amazon.com and other outlets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The remarkable tale of friendship focuses on Pudditat, a stray feline with a fierce reputation as a bully who grew close to Tervel, a blind farm dog afraid to leave the safety of his bed. Pudditat becomes a seeing-eye-dog of sorts, leading Tervel around with her tail in a delightful show of animals helping each other out.

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I am fascinated by such memories. For instance (from an Epoch Times story):

Beth Culpepper’s daughter, Carson, reported memories at a young age of what Culpepper thinks is her daughter’s past-life death in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing.

“If you die in a violent event, you can come back remembering your past life,” Culpepper said. Her daughter reports a memory of a man who drove his truck into a building, an explosion.

“I was scared. I wanted to know if there were other kids out there who had talked about the Oklahoma City bombing. When I went online I found there were a lot of families who have children who will have what they call spontaneous memories of past lives, but I did not find anybody else who has a child remembering Oklahoma at that point.

But it was still reassuring to see that other families had these spontaneous memories. I wasn’t the only one that their kids talked about living before.

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As those who know my dog books are aware, my current Afghan hound Melchior (Melkie) is, from much evidence, the third incarnation of my earlier Afghan hound Balthazar (Baltho), who came back to me for the second time in Hattie. Melkie’s cat Noir is Baltho’s cat-friend Figgy/Figaro back again. See my book Baltho, The Dog Who Owned a Man and the books which are to follow.

It turns out that our brains do way more when we snooze than was once thought — and a new study suggests we can even identify and categorize words while we’re sleeping.

“We show that the sleeping brain can be far more ‘active’ in sleep than one would think,” study co-author Sid Kouider, a cognitive neuroscientist at the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris, said in a written statement. “Far from falling [into] a limbo when we fall asleep, parts of our brain can routinely process what is going on in our surroundings and apply a relevant scheme of response.”

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Sheldrake: There is a lot of circumstantial evidence for morphic resonance. The most striking experiment involved a long series of tests on rat learning that started in Harvard in the 1920s and continued over several decades. Rats learned to escape from a water-maze and subsequent generations learned faster and faster. At the time this looked like an example of Lamarckian inheritance, which was taboo. The interesting thing is that after the rats had learned to escape more than 10 times quicker at Harvard, when rats were tested in Edinburgh, Scotland and in Melbourne, Australia they started more or less where the Harvard rats left off. In Melbourne the rats continued to improve after repeated testing, and this effect was not confined to the descendants of trained rats, suggesting a morphic resonance rather than epigenetic effect. I discuss this evidence in A New Science of Life, now in its third edition, called Morphic Resonance in the US.

Horgan: Is animal telepathy a necessary consequence of morphic resonance?

Sheldrake: Animal telepathy is a consequence of the way that animal groups are organized by what I call morphic fields. Morphic resonance is primarily to do with an influence from the past, whereas telepathy occurs in the present and depends on the bonds between members of the group. For example, when a dog is strongly bonded to its owner, this bond persists even when the owner is far away and is, I think, the basis of telepathic communication. I see telepathy as a normal, not paranormal, means of communication between members of animal groups. For example many dogs know when their owners are coming home and start waiting for them by a door or window. My experiments on the subject are described in my book Dogs That Know When Their Owners Are Coming Home. Dogs still know even when people set off at times randomly chosen by the experimenter, and travel in unfamiliar vehicles. One of these experiments can be seen here: http://www.sheldrake.org/videos/jaytee-a-dog-who-knew-when-his-owner-was-coming-home-the-orf-experiment

More of this interesting interview.

Depression has a way of being an all-consuming, monster of a battle. It takes a toll physically and emotionally. It’s often stigmatized. But perhaps one of the biggest struggles for those who suffer is the feeling that no one else in the world can truly understand what they’re going through.

However, those feelings of isolation provide one of the biggest opportunities for loved ones to help, explains Gregory Dalack, M.D., chair of the department of psychiatry at the University of Michigan.

“The key thing is to help the [depressed] person know that you understand that they’re ill,” he tells The Huffington Post. “A lot of people view depression as some sort of character flaw. To let someone know that you understand that this is an illness that needs to be treated is important.”

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It’s not the first time scientists have linked humans in a brain-to-brain interface. Last year, a University of Washington scientist successfully sent a brain signal over the internet to control and move the hand of his colleague.

While current brain-to-brain interfaces are rudimentary, scientists envision a more sophisticated version of the technology that could facilitate communication for people who have problems speaking, such as stroke victims.

“We hope that in the longer term this could radically change the way we communicate with each other,” Dr. Giulio Ruffini, a theoretical physicist at Starlab in Barcelona and co-author on the study, told AFP.

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Thomas Ramey Watson is an affiliate faculty member of Regis University's College of Professional Studies. He has served as an Episcopal chaplain (lay), trained as a psychotherapist, done postdoctoral work at Cambridge University, and was named a Research Fellow at Yale University.

In addition to his scholarly writings, he is a published author of poetry and fiction.

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