Archive for November, 2012

Hilarious parrot

Friday, November 30th, 2012

Here’s a parrot who’s learned to laugh while dabbling in a few foreign languages. After charming a few tourists with various greetings, this parrot chuckles infectiously and ensures that everyone’s having a great trip.

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The necessity of large scale composting

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

But the next time someone facilely insists that the “future of farms is industrial,” ask what the plan is regarding phosphorous. Developing an agriculture that’s ready for a phosphorous shortage means a massive focus on recycling the nutrients we take from the soil back into the soil—in other words, composting, not on a backyard level but rather on a society-wide scale. It also requires policies that give farmers incentives to build up organic matter in soil, so it holds in nutrients instead of letting them leach away (another massive problem stemming from our reliance on abundant NPK). Both of these solutions, of course, are specialties of organic agriculture.

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Goats that sound like other animals, including humans

Wednesday, November 28th, 2012

Goats have gone beyond “bahs” to explore the deeper meaning of language. What they have discovered is a bizarre and hilarious mix between barnyard speak and human conversation. Now have a listen to these farm animals’ attempts at linguistics. Even if you can’t decode it, it is bound to make you laugh.

Watch hilarious video.

Bear-faced cheek!

Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

Beautiful black cub takes a break from climbing to poke its tongue out at photographer

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2235737/Bear-cheek-Beautiful-black-cub-takes-break-climbing-tree-poking-tongue-photographer.html#ixzz2D4oYIQtB
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6 Crazy Sex Myths

Monday, November 26th, 2012

Here’s a fact for you: Knowing more about sex is good for your sex life. But although sex is one of the most popular activities in the world (it originates back to, well, the beginning of mankind), it’s also one of the most secretive. So, it’s only natural that countless myths have accumulated around the topic over the years. Some of them are outlandish and downright ridiculous (aphrodisiac green M&Ms, anyone?), but as crazy as they are, some myths are actually true.

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Pay Pal added to my Baltho, The Dog Who Owned a Man site

Sunday, November 25th, 2012

I’ve added Pay Pal to my website so people can order my new book, Baltho, The Dog Who Owned a Man, including signed copies, posters, bookmarks, and large address labels that I will sign for them to stick inside unsigned copies of the book. http://www.thomasrameywatson.com/editing/

Pay Pal added to my Baltho, The Dog Who Owned a Man site

Saturday, November 24th, 2012

I’ve added Pay Pal to my website so people can order my new book, Baltho, The Dog Who Owned a Man, including signed copies, posters, bookmarks, and large address labels that I will sign for them to stick inside unsigned copies of the book. http://www.thomasrameywatson.com/editing/

Love struck peacock saves turkey from dinner table

Saturday, November 24th, 2012

While the holiday season is surely a time to bask in the warm affections of friends and family, for the millions of turkeys predestined for the dinner table, conditions are bound to be a bit more oven-like. Short of a Presidential pardon, the future must seem downright bleak among these fat feathered creatures. But for one turkey in particular, salvation has arisen from the most unlikely of places — her love-affair with a peacock.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/love-struck-peacock-saves-a-turkey-from-the-dinner-table.html#ixzz2D4JGb7gb

Bunny Has Epiphany About Water (Video)

Friday, November 23rd, 2012

Watch video.

Wrens Teach Their Eggs to Sing a Password

Thursday, November 22nd, 2012

Female superb fairy wrens (Malurus cyaneus) in Australia sing to their eggs for a quite specific reason, to teach the embryos a single unique note that is a “password.” The hatchlings must incorporate this special password into their begging calls in order to get fed.

The reason for this prenatal instruction? So the wrens can identify their own offspring from those of two cuckoo species who are considered “brood parasites” because they routinely lay their eggs in other birds’ — in the wrens’ — nest. As researchers write, the “cost of making a recognition error is high” for these avian parents.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/wrens-teach-their-eggs-to-sing-a-password.html#ixzz2CsuDF9UY

Thomas Ramey Watson is an affiliate faculty member of Regis University's College of Professional Studies. He has served as an Episcopal chaplain (lay), trained as a psychotherapist, done postdoctoral work at Cambridge University, and was named a Research Fellow at Yale University.

In addition to his scholarly writings, he is a published author of poetry and fiction.

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