Archive for November, 2016

9 Habits Of Highly Emotionally Intelligent People

Friday, November 25th, 2016

How much of an impact does emotional intelligence (EQ) have on your professional success? The short answer is: a lot! It’s a powerful way to focus your energy in one direction with a tremendous result. Of all the people we’ve studied at work, we’ve found that 90% of top performers are high in emotional intelligence. You can be a top performer without emotional intelligence, but the chances are slim.

Emotional intelligence is the “something” in each of us that is a bit intangible. It affects how we manage behavior, navigate social complexities, and make personal decisions that achieve positive results. Emotional intelligence is made up of four core skills that pair up under two primary competencies: personal competence and social competence.

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The Just World Fallacy Says People Get What They Deserve

Saturday, November 19th, 2016

If a friend told you his wallet was stolen from his back pocket while he was in a strange city, what would you think? You might feel sorry for him and offer him sympathy, but you may also think, “He shouldn’t have been carrying his wallet in his back pocket in a strange place.” Though that’s a normal way to think, it’s not necessarily reasonable: wallets are stolen all the time, regardless of where they’re kept. The urge to blame the victim in that scenario stems from the just world fallacy, which is the idea that every action has just consequences. Optimistically, it says everything happens for a reason. But from a more cynical point of view, however, it says you get what you deserve. This isn’t true, of course: bad things happen to people who don’t deserve it all the time, and vice versa. But this idea seeps into many areas of everyday life, from parental advice to jury verdicts. To avoid making this mistake, stick to the facts, and try not to judge a situation based on information you don’t yet have. Learn more about the just world fallacy in the videos below.>

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The Key Predictors of Divorce

Sunday, November 13th, 2016

For 40 years, the University of Washington psychology professor and his team of researchers at the Gottman Institute have studied couples’ interactions to determine the key predictors of divorce — or as Gottman calls them, “the four horsemen of the apocalypse.” The first sign is contempt, followed by criticism, defensiveness and stonewalling, a term for emotionally withdrawing from your partner.

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7 Signs That You May Be a Sociopath

Sunday, November 6th, 2016

Everybody hates a liar. It’s not so much that a liar has misled us; it’s the fact that many of them build lies upon other lies, and absolutely refuse to come clean in many cases. Is it a problem with communication? Is something broken in their psyche? Or do they simply think that they can seriously get away with whatever it is they have planned, just so long as they can keep up the ridiculous rationalizations?

It’s hard to tell, and there are a million reasons why an individual lies. We all do it, every day. Most lies are harmless, though. Others? Not so much. The question is, how can you tell if someone is telling more than just a white lie? What if you suspect there’s a pattern at play, and that an individual’s lies are a symptom of a larger problem?

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5 Distressing Realities About The State Of Mental Health In America

Friday, November 4th, 2016

One in five American adults will experience a mental health disorder in a given year. That makes it highly likely many of us know someone who is dealing with a psychological condition. But when it comes to understanding these disorders, we often fall flat.

In honor of World Mental Health Day, we rounded up some of the most important mental health discoveries made this year. If anything, they’re proof that continued education and advocacy is critical when it comes to making life easier for those diagnosed:

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Thomas Ramey Watson is an affiliate faculty member of Regis University's College of Professional Studies. He has served as an Episcopal chaplain (lay), trained as a psychotherapist, done postdoctoral work at Cambridge University, and was named a Research Fellow at Yale University.

In addition to his scholarly writings, he is a published author of poetry and fiction.

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