Archive for the ‘economy’ Category

This Simple Mental Shift Can Enrich Everything In Your Life

Wednesday, May 10th, 2017

Those who are able to shift away from the obsessive chase for more, Twist says, often experience a renewal of sorts. “When you let go of trying to get more of what you don’t really need, it frees up oceans of energy,” she says.

That energy, Twist continues, can then be channeled into a different endeavor: paying attention to what you already have. “When you actually pay attention to nourish, love and share what you already have, it expands,” Twist explains.

More.

How Do We Lift Up Love Over Hate in This Angry Election Season?

Friday, July 22nd, 2016

From Jim Wallis, who typically is very insightful:

For those of us who are people of faith and moral conscience, how do we lift up love over hate in this angry election season? How do we point to justice instead of revenge? How do we love our neighbors as ourselves — which all our religious traditions tell us to do — and vote that way? And if our faith traditions also tell us that a society is ultimately judged by how it treats its most vulnerable people, how do we best vote for the concerns of the most vulnerable in this coming election?

These will be matters for prayerful discernment and courageous action in this critical election year.

Jim Wallis

More

The Importance of Empathy

Saturday, November 7th, 2015

Empathy might seem like a squishy, vaguely liberal word—a sentimental virtue of minor importance. But the more we learn from neuroscience and psychology, the more it appears that much of human social and economic life, not to mention individual health, fundamentally relies on it. Which makes the rise of inequality— something that threatens empathy—all the more troubling.

More.

Peter Diamandis’ new book, Bold: How to Go Big, Create Wealth and Impact the World

Saturday, March 28th, 2015

from a Huffpost interview:

Diamandis: Yes, we have ISIS. But the data overwhelmingly suggests the future I’ve been describing.

One big problem is that the news media has a grip on our imagination. The fundamental function of the news media is to deliver every piece of negative news to my living room in high definition over and over again. It’s a drug pusher that fuels our instinctual addiction to paying more attention to negative news instead of positive news.

Sure, there are lots of problems. But the world is getting better in extraordinary ways we’ve never seen before. Though you wouldn’t believe it from the headlines, violence per capita of the global population is at its lowest point in history. Food, water, sanitation, health — all have improved dramatically over the last century and will improve even more dramatically in the decades ahead.

We all tend to have this negativity bias. We need to balance that out a lot more and focus on connectivity, not negativity.

Thursday, February 19th, 2015

Update.

We made the campaign goal in the nick of time. Indiegogo allows continued funding. So please consider giving. You can donate anything from $1 and up. Every penny is appreciated!

Heard this about my Indiegogo campaign: Hi Thomas , our blog is interested in your project. We’re doing a spotlight on Indiegogo campaigns and would like to include you in the article. Great news.

Please visit and think of donating any amount. http://igg.me/at/trwhelpothers/x/9598087 The more traffic I get the more I get featured, which will help a lot.

Compassion and understanding for all creatures big and small.

 

DSC_0015_edited-3

ON A FENCE: All creatures need to share

With the gutting of the middle class many people need counseling and coaching but cannot afford to pay—often, even a co-payment: the homeless, those on Medicare & Medicaid, Obamacare, etc. This is a campaign to help Thomas Ramey Watson, Ph.D. coach and counsel them for little to no cost.

About This Campaign

This is my first time using this platform, so please let me know if you have any suggestions.

Recently I started a free Grief and Loss support group for those who are trying to find meaning in their sorrow, help others, and heal. The group meets once a month in downtown Denver. We have started with several people, almost evenly divided between male and female, all but one over 50. I was impressed with how many issues everyone shares. All are educated and have been employed in various professions.

A big hurdle is that people need to get more regular care than once a month. How they can afford it is another issue. Many cannot pay the co-payments that even Medicare, Medicaid, and Obamacare require.

 

 

The Key To Closing The Income Gap Is An Idea Almost Nobody Is Talking About

Thursday, January 22nd, 2015

From the article:

When industrialized countries fail to ensure inclusive prosperity, people stop trusting that hard work and careful planning will provide personal reward. The breakdown of that basic tenet of the social contract creates not just economic harm, the authors write, but “political alienation, a loss of social trust, and increasing conflict across the lines of race, class, and ethnicity.”

The decline of inclusive prosperity in the decades since World War II has brought threats to the democratic ideal of self-ruling pluralistic societies. As a result, “advocates and apologists for anti-democratic regimes argue that the democracies are no longer capable of managing their problems or creating a sense of social dynamism.” As with other grand economic transition periods such as the New Deal era and the tech boom of the 1990s, the commissioners write, policymakers in today’s industrialized world must navigate huge changes brought on by globalization and technology in ways that do not leave huge swathes of the populace behind — or the consequences could be far worse than the elevated economic strain and declining trust in public institutions that capitalist democracies face today.

More.

Thomas Ramey Watson is an affiliate faculty member of Regis University's College of Professional Studies. He has served as an Episcopal chaplain (lay), trained as a psychotherapist, done postdoctoral work at Cambridge University, and was named a Research Fellow at Yale University.

In addition to his scholarly writings, he is a published author of poetry and fiction.

more...