Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

DR. SANJAY GUPTA: When Illness Triggers Depression

Saturday, October 25th, 2014

For people diagnosed with a physical condition or coping with chronic illness, depression can be a common complication. According to figures from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 50 percent of asthma patients suffer from depressive symptoms, one in six people who have had a heart attack have major depression, and people with diabetes are twice as likely to be depressed.

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As John Lehrmann, MD, chairman of the psychiatry department at the Medical College of Wisconsin points out, pain associated with an illness can cause depression. “There’s no question that we understand pain is associated with increased risk of depression, and many chronic illnesses cause pain,” he said. However, even when a patient doesn’t have painful symptoms, “living with a chronic illness can affect your sense of who you are. It adds a level of stress to what you already have to live with each day.”

Depression often goes undiagnosed because it can share symptoms with the illness that triggered it, such as changes in sleeping and eating patterns or general fatigue. Fortunately, as Dr. Lehrmann noted, primary care practices are increasingly integrating mental health screening and treatment into their clinics.

More.

Atkinson: I Love My Husband, But Here’s Why I Want to Cheat

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

I was afraid of love. I know it might look like I was looking for love, but I was really following what A Course in Miracles describes as “the ego’s dictate”: seek and do not find.

What drove this attraction, as it has done many others before, was a hidden belief that love is dangerous. That if I fully dive into my love for my husband, it will engulf me, swallow me whole. There’ll be no “me” left. Just like when I was a young girl and my mum’s alcoholism drowned the whole family in her sorrows.

What drove this attraction was the possibility that I might be deeply, unwaveringly loveable. That it might actually be possible to be in love, on purpose and successful.

What drove this attraction was a subconscious drive, handed down through generations of women in my family, to sabotage happiness and push love away. I’m one of the lucky ones, married to my soul mate. This cannot possibly last. I must create trouble at base camp.

The work I live by and teach reminds me daily that I have a choice about who I want to be in the middle of my struggle. Deny what is happening inside of me, and I set myself up for a fall.

Tell the truth, and I make way for love.

So I shared it with Nige. All of it. It was hard. I felt swamped with shame. But I did it anyway. I probably saved my marriage in the process, and I’ll do it again if I have to.

I want to cheat on my husband some days.

But I want to know him, and to be known by him, more than I want to prove my fears right.

And that, my friends, is why I tell the truth.

More.

What the CDC says about cats and dogs and Ebola

Sunday, October 19th, 2014

Some helpful information for many of us.

Scientists Say ‘Infidelity Radar’ Is Real, And It Works In Minutes

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

You may be oblivious to your partner’s cheating ways, but that doesn’t mean everyone else is. In fact, a fascinating new study suggests that strangers can quickly spot a cheater just by watching how couples get along.

“People can determine whether complete strangers were cheaters or non-cheaters by simply watching them interact for a short period of time,” Dr. Nathaniel Lambert, an assistant professor at Brigham Young University’s School of Family Life and the lead author of the study, told The Huffington Post in an email.

More.

The 5 Skills That Will Increase Your Happiness

Monday, October 13th, 2014

At Happify, we’re translating the latest cutting-edge research into fun and interactive activities and games that help you build your happiness skills and form life-changing habits. Optimism, self-confidence, gratitude, hope, compassion, purpose, empathy—these are all qualities that anyone can own. You just have to learn how. And doing so will change your life.

Happify’s S.T.A.G.E. framework helps you build five key happiness skills: Savor, Thank, Aspire, Give, and Empathize.

Good article. More.

Friday, October 10th, 2014

My popular books make great summer reading—as well as gifts. My memoir, Baltho, The Dog Who Owned a Man is about my remarkable Afghan hound rescue named Baltho, with whom I shared a psychic bond. He helped me in my counseling and coaching practice by pointing out things I missed.

Balthocovericonsize

I also recommend my two new books of poetry, The Necessity of Symbols,

TRWatson_NecessityOfSymbols_coverand Love Threads, a remarkable narrative of an often paranormal love affair that takes place mostly in the soul realm. LoveThreads_COVER_LS

In my books I often talks about my many mystical experiences, not only with the living, but with those who have passed on.

 

For more on Baltho and his three incarnations (he’s now back for the third time, wanting to be known as Melchior), see this article by British writer and researcher, Geoff Ward.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is Melchior, along with Melchior and his cat Noir. Melchior is working on becoming my co-therapist again.

Melchior_&_NoirOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

If you’d like signed and inscribed copies of my books you can buy them from this site, for the regular retail price. They’re also available from Amazon.com and other outlets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seeing Eye Cat Adopts Blind Dog As Best Friend, Guides Him Everywhere

Friday, October 10th, 2014

The remarkable tale of friendship focuses on Pudditat, a stray feline with a fierce reputation as a bully who grew close to Tervel, a blind farm dog afraid to leave the safety of his bed. Pudditat becomes a seeing-eye-dog of sorts, leading Tervel around with her tail in a delightful show of animals helping each other out.

More.

Children who remember past lives

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

I am fascinated by such memories. For instance (from an Epoch Times story):

Beth Culpepper’s daughter, Carson, reported memories at a young age of what Culpepper thinks is her daughter’s past-life death in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing.

“If you die in a violent event, you can come back remembering your past life,” Culpepper said. Her daughter reports a memory of a man who drove his truck into a building, an explosion.

“I was scared. I wanted to know if there were other kids out there who had talked about the Oklahoma City bombing. When I went online I found there were a lot of families who have children who will have what they call spontaneous memories of past lives, but I did not find anybody else who has a child remembering Oklahoma at that point.

But it was still reassuring to see that other families had these spontaneous memories. I wasn’t the only one that their kids talked about living before.

More.

As those who know my dog books are aware, my current Afghan hound Melchior (Melkie) is, from much evidence, the third incarnation of my earlier Afghan hound Balthazar (Baltho), who came back to me for the second time in Hattie. Melkie’s cat Noir is Baltho’s cat-friend Figgy/Figaro back again. See my book Baltho, The Dog Who Owned a Man and the books which are to follow.

The Freaky Thing Your Brain Can Do While You’re Asleep

Saturday, October 4th, 2014

It turns out that our brains do way more when we snooze than was once thought — and a new study suggests we can even identify and categorize words while we’re sleeping.

“We show that the sleeping brain can be far more ‘active’ in sleep than one would think,” study co-author Sid Kouider, a cognitive neuroscientist at the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris, said in a written statement. “Far from falling [into] a limbo when we fall asleep, parts of our brain can routinely process what is going on in our surroundings and apply a relevant scheme of response.”

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Scientific Heretic Rupert Sheldrake on Morphic Fields, Psychic Dogs and Other Mysteries

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

Sheldrake: There is a lot of circumstantial evidence for morphic resonance. The most striking experiment involved a long series of tests on rat learning that started in Harvard in the 1920s and continued over several decades. Rats learned to escape from a water-maze and subsequent generations learned faster and faster. At the time this looked like an example of Lamarckian inheritance, which was taboo. The interesting thing is that after the rats had learned to escape more than 10 times quicker at Harvard, when rats were tested in Edinburgh, Scotland and in Melbourne, Australia they started more or less where the Harvard rats left off. In Melbourne the rats continued to improve after repeated testing, and this effect was not confined to the descendants of trained rats, suggesting a morphic resonance rather than epigenetic effect. I discuss this evidence in A New Science of Life, now in its third edition, called Morphic Resonance in the US.

Horgan: Is animal telepathy a necessary consequence of morphic resonance?

Sheldrake: Animal telepathy is a consequence of the way that animal groups are organized by what I call morphic fields. Morphic resonance is primarily to do with an influence from the past, whereas telepathy occurs in the present and depends on the bonds between members of the group. For example, when a dog is strongly bonded to its owner, this bond persists even when the owner is far away and is, I think, the basis of telepathic communication. I see telepathy as a normal, not paranormal, means of communication between members of animal groups. For example many dogs know when their owners are coming home and start waiting for them by a door or window. My experiments on the subject are described in my book Dogs That Know When Their Owners Are Coming Home. Dogs still know even when people set off at times randomly chosen by the experimenter, and travel in unfamiliar vehicles. One of these experiments can be seen here: http://www.sheldrake.org/videos/jaytee-a-dog-who-knew-when-his-owner-was-coming-home-the-orf-experiment

More of this interesting interview.

Thomas Ramey Watson is an affiliate faculty member of Regis University's College of Professional Studies. He has served as an Episcopal chaplain (lay), trained as a psychotherapist, done postdoctoral work at Cambridge University, and was named a Research Fellow at Yale University.

In addition to his scholarly writings, he is a published author of poetry and fiction.

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