Archive for the ‘cats’ Category

The times are dark all over the world, and anxiety is high

Sunday, March 15th, 2020
     I am going to start doing regular Facebook Live Streams and offer online counseling/coaching and support groups to help calm that anxiety and isolation. This way people will not have to come to see me in person but can still get my unique brand of help and support.
     I am working on two new books,. One is my second dog book, this one centering on Baltho’s next incarnation, named Hattie, and the lessons I learned with her and the other two dogs and cats, as my mystical insights and abilities became stronger.
     I am also working on another book about my paranormal experiences with animals and the people involved with them. I plan to publish sections on Kindle as they are ready. And then combine these sections into a full book available on Kindle and paperback.
     Here is the start of that new book.Titles are working titles. They may change.
Cloud of Witnesses Series
The communion of the living and the dead
Foreword
     We are living in dark times, hit by tragedies and suffering on every side, much caused by human beings who willfully inflict their short-sighted, egocentric views on others, heedless of the consequences to others who share our planet. Grinding poverty, disease, and displacement from war torn areas is multiplying geometrically. Some of these horrors are caused by natural disasters that batter creation everywhere and cause more even more devastation and population movement. Every time we sign on to the Internet, turn on the TV or radio, or open a newspaper we are assaulted by such horrors. We live in a world terribly out of balance—careening ever more toward the abyss.
     Yet, the still small voice of hope is always there, always calling to us to do better. After opening the box that let all kinds of illness, bloodshed, terrors and evils loose upon the world, Pandora discovered the one thing that remained was hope. I have learned to eat it like bread.
     For me that hope comes from the spiritual world that surrounds us, that calls us to the mystery that all life, past, present, and future, is connected, often in ways that we only glimpse at best. Those we care about, and those who care for us, bear witness to this, even from beyond this mortal world.
     As a Hindu friend who tried to explain her embrace of Christianity to her Hindu parents said, “God comes to me in the form of Jesus.” Prior to landing on that explanation, her parents could not understand why she would reject her Hindu heritage with many expressions of God to follow Jesus. They felt that she was rejecting them. “They now understand that God comes to us in many forms. He comes to me in the form of Jesus,” she explained. “They do not feel condemned if they do not follow him. They do not feel pressure from me. Nor do I push them in any way. We accept one another. We love.”
     That has long been my experience. I cannot tell others what path they should follow. I can only say what is true for me. When I was an undergraduate at the University of Denver at the end of the Vietnam War, everything—every tradition was questioned, every institution was distrusted, most of all, the government. Like Kent State we had the National Guard occupy our campus, with classes cancelled and everyone in fear that the massacre that happened in Kent State might happen here in Denver. I knew members of the Weathermen from the Scholars and Honors program, males and females who believed, or said they did, that our government was so corrupt that it had to be overthrown. Drug experimentation—especially with LSD, speed, and marijuana—was widespread. I was afraid to try any of that myself. I valued my mind too much. But, like my colleagues, I questioned everything, unsure what to believe, including the moderate Christian faith of the American Baptist church I’d grown up in. My immediate family were not very churchy. I found services boring, though I’d made an early commitment at four years old to follow Jesus . . .

“We’re still part of the whole, the web of life, of all that is–God, if you like.”

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

Yesterday I had another of my unusual encounters with an animal. More important than anything in life is my experience with the soul realm. When such things happen, I always feel wiser, stronger, better centered in ultimate Reality.

I attended a monthly Reiki Shares session at the Samadhi Yoga Center on East Colfax in Denver. As I walked past the friendly young woman sitting at the counter, I noticed that she had a very happy black and white dog under her bare feet. It was lying on his side as she massaged it with her feet.

I laughed and said, “Hi Dog–you look happy,” then walked on.

Inside the Reiki room, I heard the dog talking to me. “I want to see you,” he said. I listened further. I’m not good at picking up gender. Actually I’m still not sure about hearing the voice of an animal I don’t know. After Hattie died I became more confident about hearing the voice of one of my companion animals.

I listened.

“I was abused,” he said, “but I’m very happy and grateful now. I’m loved.” I was pretty sure the dog was male.
The words returned while Reiki was performed on me. “I still have trauma about it,” he added.

When I walked out of the gathering room, I moved to the woman at the counter. She had a very sweet, open face, with the creamy complexion of a redhead. Her dog got up and came over to see me. He seemed both friendly and anxious. He kept wanting me to pet him, then backed off, and returned, sniffing at my shoes and legs. I sat down on a chair so I’d be more at his height.

“You smell my dog and cats and all the other animals I hang out with, don’t you?” I said petting him.

“He’s kind of afraid of men,” the woman said.

I asked his name.

“Josko,” she answered.

I told the woman what Josko had said. “He told me how much he loves you and is happy to be yours. He also said he’s been abused.”

The woman shook her head. “No, I’m sure he wasn’t. I got him as a puppy of 6 weeks old. He’s been with me ever since.”

I thought, “I must have been wrong.”

“He was rescued from a hoarder.”

“Early pethood experiences are just as important as early childhood experiences for us,” I assured her.

We went on to talk of the importance of bonding.

“To do that we have to open ourselves, make ourselves vulnerable to the greatest joy–and the deepest pain–imaginable,” I said. A collage of faces of people I knew who just couldn’t do that flashed before me. “I think that’s one of the gifts that our animals give us. They’re easier to bond with than many humans.”

The woman agreed. “We don’t do it very well.”

“It’s the most rewarding, as well as painful thing, we’re called to do,” I added. “It means being open to losing everything, especially the beloved. And the threat of losing ourselves in the process.”

“I think that’s what we’re meant to do” the woman said.

“From that we gain a much deeper, truer sense of self,” I added. That’s the main difference between Western Religious Traditions and Eastern Religious Traditions. “We’re still part of the whole, the web of life, of all that is–God, if you like.”

Comics Purr-fectly Capture What Animals Would Say If They Could Talk

Monday, June 20th, 2016

These are well worth checking out.

What Life Is Like Before And After You Get A Dog, In 9 Comics

Saturday, February 20th, 2016

Good comics.

Abraham Lincoln’s respect for life extended from humanity to all creatures

Friday, April 17th, 2015

Lincoln was like more than a few of us whose pets have run of the house these days: He also left to those friends the dog’s favorite horsehair sofa on which to nap, as well as a long, specific list of rules for how Fido was to be treated during his waking hours. For example, Fido was not to be scolded if he came inside with muddy paws, and he was to be fed from the dinner table.

Lincoln’s attitudes and relationships with animals were in some ways ahead of their time. Matthew Algeo, author of the new book, Abe & Fido: Lincoln’s Love of Animals and the Touching Story of His Favorite Canine Companion, paints a picture of Lincoln as a deeply compassionate and empathetic person, whose respect for life extended from his fellow men all the way down to the smallest creatures.

 

More.

Thomas Ramey Watson is an affiliate faculty member of Regis University's College of Professional Studies. He has served as an Episcopal chaplain (lay), trained as a psychotherapist, done postdoctoral work at Cambridge University, and was named a Research Fellow at Yale University.

In addition to his scholarly writings, he is a published author of poetry and fiction.

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